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Another revolting 1970s recipe from my complete set of Good Housekeeping cookery cards; beautifully photographed in full colour with wipe-clean surfaces, they are designed to help you in two ways: to provide you with a repertoire of delicious recipes selected from Good Housekeeping magazine’s famous Creative Cookery series, and also to simplify the complex business of planning perfect menus. For Good Housekeeping cookery cards have an extra value – each one includes ideas for two more suitable courses to make up a complete three-course meal, linking the recipes to other cards in the series.

You don’t have to be an expert cook to produce these superb dishes. All recipes have been double-tested. All are clear and easy-to-follow. All include oven temperatures, cooking times, and number of servings.

Ingredients

Praline:
5 oz. sugar
2 tbsp water
pinch of cream of tartar
2 oz. unblanched whole almonds

Soufflé:
3 large eggs, separated
¼ pint milk
2 tbsp coffee liqueur
3 level tsp gelatine
2 tbsp water
¼ pint double cream
¼ pint single cream
toasted flaked almonds for decoration

Method

Make praline. Dissolve the sugar in the water, add cream of tartar and almonds. Bring to the boil and simmer until syrup is golden brown. Pour on to an oiled baking sheet or marble slab. When cold crush with a rolling pin.

Put egg yolks, milk and coffee liqueur in a double saucepan or bowl over a pan of hot water. Cook until thick, stirring. Stir in gelatine dissolved in 2 tbsp water in the usual way. Cool until half set.

Whip together the double and single cream until it holds its shape. Fold all but 1 tbsp cream into egg mixture with praline followed by egg white.

Turn into a prepared 1-pint soufflé dish. Leave to set in the refrigerator.

Carefully remove paper. Decorate edge with flaked almonds. Pipe a whirl of cream in the centre.

Another revolting 1970s recipe from my complete set of Good Housekeeping cookery cards; beautifully photographed in full colour with wipe-clean surfaces, they are designed to help you in two ways: to provide you with a repertoire of delicious recipes selected from Good Housekeeping magazine’s famous Creative Cookery series, and also to simplify the complex business of planning perfect menus. For Good Housekeeping cookery cards have an extra value – each one includes ideas for two more suitable courses to make up a complete three-course meal, linking the recipes to other cards in the series.

You don’t have to be an expert cook to produce these superb dishes. All recipes have been double-tested. All are clear and easy-to-follow. All include oven temperatures, cooking times, and number of servings.

Ingredients

8 medium-sized tomatoes
salt
3 tbsp cream
2-3 tsp lemon juice
¼ level tsp freshly ground black pepper
¼ level tsp sugar
1 level tbsp freshly chopped mint
lettuce

Method

Skin the tomatoes, cut in half, remove and discard pips. Roughly chop and sprinkle with salt.

Blend together the cream, lemon juice, pepper, sugar, and mint.

Arrange tomatoes on crisp lettuce leaves on four small plates. Spoon dressing over.

Suitable for vegetarians … if you know any.

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Another revolting 1970s recipe from my complete set of Good Housekeeping cookery cards; beautifully photographed in full colour with wipe-clean surfaces, they are designed to help you in two ways: to provide you with a repertoire of delicious recipes selected from Good Housekeeping magazine’s famous Creative Cookery series, and also to simplify the complex business of planning perfect menus. For Good Housekeeping cookery cards have an extra value – each one includes ideas for two more suitable courses to make up a complete three-course meal, linking the recipes to other cards in the series.

You don’t have to be an expert cook to produce these superb dishes. All recipes have been double-tested. All are clear and easy-to-follow. All include oven temperatures, cooking times, and number of servings.

Lard and tinned pineapple make this dish. If you can’t get lard and tinned pineapple, forget it.

Ingredients

1 lb. pork, minced
1 clove garlic, peeled and crushed
1½ oz. flour
2 oz. fresh white bread-crumbs
salt and pepper
1 egg yolk
1 oz. lard

For the sauce:
3 oz. sugar
4 tbsp cider vinegar
3 tbsp soy sauce
1½ level tbsp cornflour
½ pint water
1 green pepper, blanched and cut in thin strips
½ lb. tomatoes, skinned and quartered
11 oz. can crushed pineapple

Method

Mix together the pork, garlic, ½ oz. flour, bread-crumbs, salt, and pepper. Add the egg yolk and mix well.

Form into 24 balls, toss in remaining 1 oz. flour.

Heat lard in frying-pan. Add balls and fry gently for 20 minutes, turning frequently until golden.

Meanwhile, put sugar, vinegar, and soy sauce in a saucepan. Blend cornflour with the water and add to ingredients in pan.

Bring to the boil, stirring. Simmer gently for 5 minutes, then add green pepper, tomatoes, and pineapple. Simmer for a further 5 minutes.

To serve, pour pork balls into a warmed casserole dish and pour the sauce over.

Remember to keep your pork balls warm and get the sauce all over them. Use your fingers if necessary.

Another revolting 1970s recipe from my complete set of Good Housekeeping cookery cards; beautifully photographed in full colour with wipe-clean surfaces, they are designed to help you in two ways: to provide you with a repertoire of delicious recipes selected from Good Housekeeping magazine’s famous Creative Cookery series, and also to simplify the complex business of planning perfect menus. For Good Housekeeping cookery cards have an extra value – each one includes ideas for two more suitable courses to make up a complete three-course meal, linking the recipes to other cards in the series.

You don’t have to be an expert cook to produce these superb dishes. All recipes have been double-tested. All are clear and easy-to-follow. All include oven temperatures, cooking times, and number of servings.

Ingredients

1 onion, peeled and finely chopped
2 tbsp olive oil
¼ pint dry white wine
bouquet garni
clove of garlic, peeled
salt and freshly ground black pepper
1 lb. button mushrooms, de-stalked
½ lb. tomatoes
chopped parsley

Method

Sauté the chopped onion in the oil until soft but not coloured. Add wine, bouquet garni and garlic. Season with salt and pepper.

Wipe the mushrooms. Peel, halve and pip the tomatoes. Add to the onion mixture.

Cook gently, uncovered, for about 10 minutes.

Remove from the heat, allow to cool. Remove herbs and garlic, if wished add 2 more tbsp olive oil.

Serve chilled, sprinkled with chopped parsley.

Click to embiggen (recommended)

(The Grauniad, 29 September 1971)

Citing a “profound lack of political, social and economic equality for women”, feminists across Britain announced their intention of staging an indefinite humour strike from next month.

The strike, directors of the recently formed Society for Cutting Up Men (SCUM) said, will be halted when women are treated as equal to men in all areas of society.

“Until the day comes when we are treated with the same respect as men, we will refuse to find the humour in anything,” SCUM spokeswoman Rita Fairclough said. “This bold move will force British society to re-think its attitude to women, just as Gandhi’s hunger strike forced the post-imperial British government to re-think their colonial occupation of another land.”

Items that will not be accepted by the humour strikers are jokes which refer to women in the workplace, women in the home, women’s relationships with men, childbirth, child rearing, family life, and sex.

In addition, jokes about the feminists’ lack of humour itself will not be tolerated.

Another revolting 1970s recipe from my complete set of Good Housekeeping cookery cards; beautifully photographed in full colour with wipe-clean surfaces, they are designed to help you in two ways: to provide you with a repertoire of delicious recipes selected from Good Housekeeping magazine’s famous Creative Cookery series, and also to simplify the complex business of planning perfect menus. For Good Housekeeping cookery cards have an extra value – each one includes ideas for two more suitable courses to make up a complete three-course meal, linking the recipes to other cards in the series.

You don’t have to be an expert cook to produce these superb dishes. All recipes have been double-tested. All are clear and easy-to-follow. All include oven temperatures, cooking times, and number of servings.

Ingredients

4 dozen mussels, about 6 pints
4 shallots or 1 medium onion, peeled
butter
1 bottle dry white wine
chopped parsley
2 sprigs thyme, if available
1 bay leaf
freshly ground black pepper
butter
2 level tsp flour

Method

Place mussels in a large bowl and under running water. Scrape off mud, barnacles, seaweed and “beards” with a small sharp knife. Discard any that are open or even just loose (unless a tap on their shell makes them close) or are cracked. Rinse again until there is no trace of sand in the bowl.

Finely chop shallots. Melt a large knob of butter and sauté shallots until soft but not coloured.

Add wine, a small handful of chopped parsley, thyme, bay leaf and several turns from the pepper mill. Simmer, covered, for 10 minutes.

Add drained mussels, a handful at a time. Cover and steam, shaking often until shells open (about 5 minutes).

Remove top shells over saucepan to catch juices and place mussels in wide soup plates. Keep warm.

Strain liquor and reduce by half, thicken a little by adding a small knob of butter creamed with 2 level tsp flour, whisked in, in small pieces. Adjust seasoning. When cooked, pour over mussels.

Sprinkle with freshly chopped parsley. Serve at once. Use forks for mussels, soup spoons for the juices. Serve with plenty of crusty bread.

Another revolting 1970s recipe from my complete set of Good Housekeeping cookery cards; beautifully photographed in full colour with wipe-clean surfaces, they are designed to help you in two ways: to provide you with a repertoire of delicious recipes selected from Good Housekeeping magazine’s famous Creative Cookery series, and also to simplify the complex business of planning perfect menus. For Good Housekeeping cookery cards have an extra value – each one includes ideas for two more suitable courses to make up a complete three-course meal, linking the recipes to other cards in the series.

You don’t have to be an expert cook to produce these superb dishes. All recipes have been double-tested. All are clear and easy-to-follow. All include oven temperatures, cooking times, and number of servings.

What makes this classic dessert are the canned pineapple cubes, or chunks, which make it look like a pile of fruity vomit.

Ingredients

1 lb. fresh strawberries, hulled
1 level tbsp caster sugar
2 tbsp Kirsch
16 oz. can pineapple cubes
¾ pint double cream
1 egg white
1 oz. caster sugar

Method

Slice all but a few of the strawberries. Put 1 level tbsp sugar and the Kirsch into a dish. Add the strawberries and leave them to marinate for 1-2 hours.

Drain the pineapple, reserve a few pieces for decoration and pulp the remainder.

Lightly whip the cream until it holds its shape.

Whisk egg white until stiff. Add remaining sugar and whisk again until stiff. Fold into the cream with pineapple purée.

Spoon most of the strawberries into the base of a serving dish. Top with pineapple cream. Chill for a short time only before serving decorated with pineapple pieces and sliced and whole berries. Serve sponge drops separately.

Another revolting 1970s recipe from my complete set of Good Housekeeping cookery cards; beautifully photographed in full colour with wipe-clean surfaces, they are designed to help you in two ways: to provide you with a repertoire of delicious recipes selected from Good Housekeeping magazine’s famous Creative Cookery series, and also to simplify the complex business of planning perfect menus. For Good Housekeeping cookery cards have an extra value – each one includes ideas for two more suitable courses to make up a complete three-course meal, linking the recipes to other cards in the series.

You don’t have to be an expert cook to produce these superb dishes. All recipes have been double-tested. All are clear and easy-to-follow. All include oven temperatures, cooking times, and number of servings.

Ingredients

24-26 soft sponge fingers
6 oz. caster sugar
2 level tbsp cornflour
½ pint double cream
½ pint milk
2 oz. unsweetened chocolate
2 egg yolks
1 oz. butter
1 level tsp gelatine
2 tsp water
toasted flaked almonds for decoration

Method

Line a loaf tin 7 in. by 5 in. with a strip of non-stick paper. Arrange some sponge fingers to cover the base and sides.

In a saucepan blend together the sugar and cornflour. Gradually stir in the milk and ¼ pint cream.

Break chocolate into pieces, add to the milk, bring slowly to the boil. Stir all the time. Boil gently for 2-3 mins, stirring. Cool for a few mins, beat in egg yolks.

Return to heat, cook 1 min. Beat in butter.

Sprinkle gelatine over 2 tsp water, stir into chocolate mixture. Cool, stirring occasionally. When beginning to thicken, pour half the mixture over the sponge fingers.

Cover with another layer of sponge fingers. Spoon over remainder of chocolate mixture. Cut sponge fingers level with chocolate mixture. Use bits to place over chocolate in a final layer.

Leave overnight in the refrigerator. To serve, turn out on a flat dish.

Whip rest of cream. Cover the top of the cake with cream and strew with almonds.

Good Housekeeping cookery cards, beautifully photographed in full colour with wipe-clean surfaces, are designed to help you in two ways: to provide you with a repertoire of delicious recipes selected from Good Housekeeping magazine’s famous Creative Cookery series, and also to simplify the complex business of planning perfect menus. For Good Housekeeping cookery cards have an extra value – each one includes ideas for two more suitable courses to make up a complete three-course meal, linking the recipes to other cards in the series.

You don’t have to be an expert cook to produce these superb dishes. All recipes have been double-tested. All are clear and easy-to-follow. All include oven temperatures, cooking times, and number of servings.

Ingredients

1 oz. butter
4 large eggs
salt and pepper
4 tbsp single cream
parsley for garnish
toast triangles

Method

Take four individual cocotte ovenproof dishes and put a knob of butter into the bottom of each.

Carefully break an egg into each dish, season with salt and freshly milled pepper.

Spoon 1 tbsp cream over each.

Bake in the oven at 350° F for 12-20 minutes until whites are just set.

Serve straight from the oven garnished with parsley. Partner with toast triangles and butter.

Variations:

First line each dish with lightly cooked bacon rashers, cut to size; or sprinkle eggs with grated Gruyère or Dutch cheese and cook until it is meltingly golden, then top with a dusting of paprika or finely chopped parsley.

Black Dogs Defined

This is the best of me; for the rest, I ate, and drank, and slept, loved and hated, like another: my life was as the vapour and is not; but this I saw and knew; this, if anything of mine, is worth your memory.

(John Ruskin, Sesame and Lilies)

Whatever people say I am, that’s what I’m not.

(Alan Sillitoe, Saturday Night and Sunday Morning)

This is my letter to the world, that never wrote to me.

(Emily Dickinson, This is my letter to the world)

Safe upon the solid rock the ugly houses stand:
Come and see my shining palace built upon the sand!

(Edna St. Vincent Millay, Second Fig)

R.A.D. Stainforth

I was born before The Beatles’ first LP and brought up in the reeking slums of Jericho. I am in love with a woman called Hazel and in love with her daughter, also called Hazel, both of whom I met at Alcoholics Anonymous.

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